Tuxford is an old coaching town in the north of Nottinghamshire between Newark and Retford and around a minute from the A1.

The quaint village was once a hub for travellers and boasted four railway stations. Today, it is a great destination for tourists thanks to its variety of independent shops and attractions. Some of the highlights include a large, working windmill which is open to visitors daily (except Tuesdays) and sells its own flour in its shop and the Walks of Life handcart museum, which chronicles our history on wheels.

Another must for visitors is the Museum of the Horse which is situated in the old Coaching Inn, The Newcastle Arms, and which is also home to the internationally-known sporting art dealer and publisher Sally Mitchell Fine Arts Ltd.  The town also boasts an old lock up where the prisoners stayed overnight on their way to London and the unique Rebel Stone where it is said a Jacobite prisoner - of some importance - broke his neck leaping from a coach and was buried standing up on the side of the old Great North Road. The town has ancient tunnels running under although these are not open to the public.

The town has three good car parks all within easy walking distance of the museums and shops. On the edge of the town are two camping and caravanning venues including Orchard Park on Marnham Road.

Tuxford was designated a conservation area in 1980 and has recently been greatly restored with the help of  English Heritage.

Places of interest nearby include Laxton, a picturesque village where the strip farming of medieval times can still be seen and which is also home to the National Holocaust Centre. West Markham, which is about a mile away, has one of the oldest Saxon churches in the country. At Milton visitors can see the mausoleum built by the Duke of Newcastle for his wife in 1832.

Credit to: Experience Nottinghamshire